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StarTalk Radio

Science meets pop culture on StarTalk Radio!

Astrophysicist and Hayden Planetarium director Neil deGrasse Tyson, his comic co-hosts, guest celebrities and scientists discuss astronomy, physics, and everything else about life in the universe. Keep Looking Up!
Welcome to the StarTalk Radio Google+ Page, where you can find information about new episodes of StarTalk Radio, new YouTube videos and captivating news for fans with a cosmic perspective. If you're a StarTalk Radio fan, please add us to your circles and tell your friends.




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Date Following Followers Gained
Recent Popular Posts
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About 8 weeks ago Happy 450th birthday to Galileo Galilei
Italian physicist, mathematician, astronomer, and philosopher who played a major role in the scientific revolution.
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About 3 weeks ago Two Suns Could Make More Habitable Moons
From Astrobio.net: Moons in close binary solar systems have a better chance of hosting life than those in single-star systems, new research has shown. Binary stars dampen each other's solar radiation and stellar winds, thereby creating a more hospitable environment for life and increasing the habitable zone around such solar systems, according to research presented at the 223rd American Astronomical Society meeting in January.
Shown: An artist's image of Kepler-35, where a Saturn-size planet orbits a pair of sun-like stars. Such systems could host an exomoon within the habitable zone of the stars. Credit: Lior Taylor
Read more:
http://www.astrobio.net/exclusive/5983/two-suns-could-make-more-habitable-moons



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About 5 weeks ago Astronomers Identify the Largest Yellow “Hypergiant” Star Known
From Universe Today: The stats for the star are impressive indeed: dubbed HR 5171 A, the binary system weighs in at a combined 39 solar masses, has a radius of over 1,300 times that of our Sun, and is a million times as luminous. Located 3,600 parsecs or over 11,700 light years distant, the star is 50% larger than the famous red giant Betelgeuse. Plop HR 5171 A down into the center of our own solar system, and it would extend out over 6 astronomical units (A.U.s) past the orbit of Jupiter.
Shown: An artist’s impression of the yellow hypergiant binary star HR 5171. Credit: ESO
http://www.universetoday.com/110205/astronomers-identify-the-largest-yellow-hypergiant-star-known/


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About 2 weeks ago Hubble finds that monster 'El Gordo' galaxy cluster is bigger than thought
From Nanowerk: NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has weighed the largest known galaxy cluster in the distant universe and found that it definitely lives up to its nickname: El Gordo (Spanish for "the fat one"). By precisely measuring how much the gravity from the cluster's mass warps images of far-more-distant background galaxies, a team of astronomers has calculated the cluster's mass to be as much as 3 million billion times the mass of our Sun. The Hubble data show that the cluster is roughly 43 percent more massive than earlier estimates based on X-ray and dynamical studies of the unusual cluster.
http://www.nanowerk.com/news2/space/newsid=35074.php

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About 9 weeks ago For Valentines Day, from APOD NASA - IC 1805 Light from the Heart
FROM APOD: Explanation: Sprawling across almost 200 light-years, emission nebula IC 1805 is a mix of glowing interstellar gas and dark dust clouds about 7,500 light-years away in the Perseus spiral arm of our galaxy. Stars were born in this region whose nickname, the Heart Nebula, derives from its Valentine's-Day-appropriate shape. The clouds themselves are shaped by stellar winds and radiation from massive hot stars in the nebula's newborn star cluster Melotte 15 about 1.5 million years young. This deep telescopic image maps the pervasive light of narrow emission lines from atoms in the nebula to a color palette made popular in Hubble images of star forming regions. The field of view spans about two degrees on the sky or four times the diameter of a full moon. The cosmic heart is found in the constellation of Cassiopeia, the boastful mythical Queen of Aethiopia.
Image Credit & Copyright: César Blanco González
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About 3 weeks ago Discovery! Possible Dwarf Planet Found Far Beyond Pluto’s Orbit
From Universe Today: Today, astronomers announced the discovery of 2012 VP113, a world that, assuming its reflectivity is moderate, is 280 miles (450 kilometers) in size and orbiting even further away from the sun than Pluto or even the more distant Sedna (announced in 2004). If 2012 VP113 is made up mostly of ice, this would make it large (and round) enough to be a dwarf planet, the astronomers said…Shown: Artist’s conception of Sedna, a dwarf planet in the solar system that only gets within 76 astronomical units (Earth-sun distances) of our sun. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech Read more: http://www.universetoday.com/110719/discovery-possible-dwarf-planet-found-far-beyond-plutos-orbit/
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About 2 weeks ago Team finds regolith of small asteroids formed by thermal fatigue
From Phys.org: The centimeter-sized fragments and smaller particles that make up the regolith—the layer of loose, unconsolidated rock and dust—of small asteroids is formed by temperature cycling that breaks down rock in a process called thermal fatigue, according to a paper published today in the Nature Advance Online Publication.
Shown: An artist's impression of an asteroid breaking up. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
http://phys.org/news/2014-04-team-regolith-small-asteroids-thermal.html


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About 4 weeks ago Almost snack time for our galaxy’s supermassive black hole
From Earthsky.org: Astronomers have been watching and waiting since 2011 to see what will happen when an encroaching cloud of gas sweeps near the supermassive black hole at the center of our Milky Way galaxy. Image Credit: Image via ESO/MPE/M. Schartmann/L. Calçada
http://earthsky.org/space/almost-snack-time-for-our-galaxys-supermassive-black-hole

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About 6 weeks ago Why Astrophotographers Do What They Do (PHOTOS)
If you want to see some awesome photos of the night sky, check out this article on The Weather Channel. Shown here: Stars seen above Laguna Tebinquinche in San Pedro de Atacama, Chile in Oct. 2013. (Nicholas Buer)
http://www.weather.com/news/science/why-astrophotographers-do-what-they-do-photos-20140228

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About 4 weeks ago Almost an X Class Solar Flare
From NASA: The Sun unleashed a M-9.3 flare, just short of an X class (the largest) from an active region right at the Sun's edge (Mar. 12-13, 2014). The bright flash is the tell tale sign of a flare. The brightness of the flare causes very bright saturation and blooming above and below the flare region on the CCD detector and caused extended diffraction patterns to spread out across the SDO imager. The video clip shows a smaller flare preceded this one as well. The video covers about 15 hours. The still shows the peak of the flare at 22:38 UT on Mar. 12. Images were taken in extreme ultraviolet light, showing ionized iron at 10 million degrees. Credit: Solar Dynamics Observatory/NASA.
 For video, click here: http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/potw500-almost-an-x-class-flare/